Monday, September 2, 2013

How To Look Expensive



I love thinking about the concept of dressing yourself in a way that conveys wealth and class in an old-fashioned sense.  Of course even money is no guarantee you will look good.  As we all know, extremely rich people can still look cheap.  There are plenty of walking testimonies, celebrity or otherwise, that you can look tacky even having spent plenty.  And there are those without much money but an innate sense of their own style who can look fabulously upmarket.

So what are the elements that make someone look quietly expensive?  Just for fun, here are my favourite ideas, gathered from internet searches over time, and also my own notes on when I feel good.  I have a few posts planned on this topic, with this first one focusing on our personal style.

Firstly, I think colour plays a big part.  To me, ‘expensive’ colours are neutrals, worn together.  Think a whole outfit in tones of caramel and cream.  Black and off-white or black and caramel are very stylish too.  In general black, navy, winter white, beige or caramel and red, and adding soft, muted tones of blush pink, sea-foam green, Tiffany blue and other such shades depending on what suits your colouring.  Colours I do not think are luxurious and wealthy are the lurid brights – neon pink, bright purple, yellow, orange.  Especially when paired with black.  I remember Trinny and Susannah saying once that putting black with a bright colour makes both look cheap.

Fabric-wise, I always think woven, or structured knits look more expensive.  Going the other way are floppy t-shirt knits or floaty boho type clothing.  Again, this is my personal taste in clothing coming out, but I always feel more pulled together in a pressed shirt and dark fitted jeans or a semi-fitted dress with simple lines.

Wearing classic styles, I consider to whisper money.  Luckily I love the classics and never feel more at home in a pair of well-cut jeans and a white shirt (to me, the Hamptons look), or in tailored black pants and a tuxedo front shirt or flattering black top with high heels if dressing up.

Shoe-wise, I love the classics too – the black leather ballet flat, white or navy canvas Converse sneakers (low-tops please, I’ll leave the hi-tops to the youngsters).  A perfectly pointed stiletto heel never goes out of fashion.  I always think chunky heels make a leg look chunky, even on skinny starlets.  Wedges ditto but there are some very cute wedges out there that are a bit finer, not so extreme that look pretty and well-bred.

I know tattoos are a big trend currently but I just think they look so vulgar.  In my opinion, there is no way anyone with class and style would have a tattoo, even a hidden one.  My husband often says a good business idea to get into would be tattoo removal, because there will be a lot of people wanting that in the future, and I have to agree.

Consider where you are going.  When I visit a dear friend in an old money part of town, I love dressing up in my most classic outfits, clothing I imagine I might wear if I lived there.  Without fail I always feel richest in my classic clothing.

Take notes on what others are wearing when you visit wealthy areas.  There is nothing I love more than (after dressing up) than taking a stroll around the shops, maybe try on some clothing or just have a look through the stores in fancy areas.  I notice the outfits and details others are wearing on the streets.  Funnily enough I am more interested in what the older ladies are wearing, I don’t know what’s up with that.  There is a different vibe in wealthy areas.  I like to absorb it and take it home with me.

Wearing big sunglasses I think imparts an air of mystery and glamour.  I have gotten out of the habit over winter but need to polish my favourite ones and start wearing them every day.  Plus they protect your eyes from the sun, which is important for both the eyes themselves, and also preventing wrinkles.  I adore aviators too, they look very luxe to me.

Attending to grooming is très important.  Even when at home by myself, and especially when out.  I have been perfecting my grooming regime over time, and by making myself do it even when I couldn’t be bothered it’s now become a habit, much like brushing my teeth, that I do it automatically.

I exfoliate and shave my legs in the shower every two days and wash my hair every second day on the alternate days so I don’t spend too long in the shower.  I apply body lotion every single morning on every part of my body I can reach.  Sometimes it is plain, and sometimes it matches my perfume.

I always wear perfume, even on a home day!  I wear it for me, so I am never without it.  Currently I enjoy having a variety to choose from.  I still enjoy my Chanel No. 5, and more recently Chanel Coco Noir (softer than you would think), however I have a wardrobe of inexpensive fragrances too, for everyday wear.

Painted nails suggest you have plenty of time to lounge around being attended to, but they also suggest you take care of yourself.  I always do my toes in the summer (I gave them a break this winter), but I haven’t done my fingernails in years as working in a shoe shop meant they chipped within one day.  I am inspired to try again with my fingers though.  I read that Butter London polishes are different and don’t chip, so I will try one of their colours.

For makeup, the wealthy look is le no makeup look, with not too much around the eyes.  A polished, natural glow, and a bit of bronzer.  Being so fair, I always look too orange with bronzer (even pale ones), which is a shame as I love the look on others.  So I go the peaches and cream route with a tiny amount of foundation and concealer, a dusting of translucent powder, pinky blush and glossy lips.  Groomed brows and a little eyeliner and mascara completes my look.

As I said before, even when I am at home I wear perfume and a little makeup (less than if I’m going to work).  Somehow it affects the way I act and how efficient I am throughout the day.  Even though I can’t see myself unless I pass a mirror, I feel like less of a slob!

Lastly is jewellery.  Keeping my real jewellery very clean ensures its sparkle and therefore the wealthy look.  If you don’t have jewellery cleaner, dishwashing liquid and a clean toothbrush will make it look beautiful.  Use on gold and all precious stones except for emeralds.  I squirt a tiny amount of dishwash on the toothbrush, clean my ring or necklace (including the chain) carefully and then rinse in warm water and dry.  You will be amazed how good they look.  Pearls just need a polish with a soft cloth and plenty of wear, as the oils in your skin keep them nice.

Actually, clean is probably is one of the biggest things in looking expensive.  Think pristine light coloured clothing, just-washed bouncy hair, sparkling jewellery and polished, clean shoes.

What else would you add to this list?

52 comments:

  1. I can understand what you're saying, but the tattoo thing seems pretty harsh. Check out Stina, incredibly elegant, beautiful, and intelligent woman.

    Prints and bright colors can be tricky, but can still look sophisticated when done right. Think Pucci and Hermes.

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  2. Great post! With the points you've mentioned, i believe it all boils down to how you carry yourself.

    I'm not one for bright colour either, but when done right it works. And that also factors into colours that compliment your skin tone. Peach/muted orange look amazing on my dark skin

    As much as i like discrete/hidden tattoos that have personal meaning on others, its not something i'll ever consider on myself because i know that the main origin of tattoos where i'm from is based on slave trade {owners marking people as theirs and slaves using tattoos as a way to remember where they are from}

    Looking forward to future posts on this

    xo Stephanie

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  3. Great post. You have covered the important elements of achieving a rich look. Only thing I would add is to take care in choosing a handbag. Nothing to big and sloppy think structured bag. Chanel 2.5 style is perfect.

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  4. I love that photo. The wardrobe for this movie was quite small and very good.

    My mom and her twin sister wore their hair up like this eveyday after the movie came out. What a handful they were! My aunt was thinner and had a navy dress she wore over and over like the short black one in the movie. She even had a large pin she wore near the waist like Audrey did in a scene in the movie. She lived in a very good neighborhood but was always low on cash. But she looked rich like you are writing about.

    Older women are very interesting. No wonder you watch them.

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  5. What a fun post. Quality over quantity is always best. And grooming...vital to looking chic. Have a lovely week.

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  6. I agree with all the points you make. I might add the best quality fabric you can afford.

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  7. This may be too much information, but we have the same shower routine. : )

    I agree with many/most of your points. While reading this post, I thought about the style book I read last year, "How To Look Expensive". I think you would enjoy it!

    xo, Heather

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  8. Thank-you for bringing back your blog, I love it. I also wear perfume everyday but I still wonder about how you are supposed to wear it. I have a Chanel No5 spray and would like to hear where you would spray it. XX

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  9. I agree with you on all the points. I confess though that just recently I've added more color to my small wardrobe (in tops). After adhering to neutrals for so long I feel that the blacks, beiges, and grays are too tiring and sad now. I've always had color in the way of scarves but you can only wear those in colder weather (it is 97*F today in So. Calif.). Actually it's liberating to venture out of the neutrals having lived there for decades! I dislike neon/bright colors at my age though (I'm 47). On another note, can you picture Audrey Hepburn with a tattoo? No. ; )

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  10. I really enjoyed reading this post. it reminded me of some great advice my older sister gave me as I approached 40 (I am 45); that as we get older it is even more important to be well groomed AND well dressed. I very much appreciate all of the great tips and look forward to more:)
    Rita, Victoria, BC

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  11. I can't agree more, I think you've covered all the points. Brilliant post!

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  12. I love it! I agree!
    Printing this one out to use as some guidance as I go through my wardrobe this week.
    Love the idea about a 'tattoo removal' business--brilliant!

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  13. I agree with most of your points here, though I do have to respectfully disagree about tattoos. I have one, though it was my 19 year old self making that decision 11 years ago. I have had laser treatments to fade it over the last few years (hurtful AND expensive!) and I keep it hidden (I wear clothes over it, never show it at work, and my hair is long enough to hide it -- the tattoo is on my back). The tattoo is an angel, so nothing vulgar and in your face if people do happen to see it.

    I don't completely regret getting the tattoo but the tattoo had faded enough that I had to make a choice whether to get it touched up or have it removed. I chose to start lasering it off as I didn't want the upkeep of touching up tattoos every few years, and I am definitely not the same person I was back when I got it...things have changed. I do think it is unfair to judge people if they have tattoos or not (hidden or shown), and if you have a tattoo, oh -- you must not have class. I disagree with that statement. I think people have done far worse, classless things than get tattoos. Just my opinion.

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  14. Oh no! The absolute last thing I would want to do is to offend anyone and perhaps my thoughts on tattoos sound judgemental. I just cannot find a good word to say about tattoos and like you LR, many people regret having had them. I know I regret having my belly button pierced (what a dismal and expensive failure that was) but at least I only have two dots to show the world. I can't imagine what it is like to have a picture or some words that you chose years ago. I still honestly think though that someone is beautiful and stylish in spite of a tattoo, not because of one.

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  15. Oh my, I just discovered you are BACK!!!! I am so happy
    my dear you humble yourself too much. Your blog is fabulous and I have missed it everyday. Your writing is perfect and Thank you so much. I would go to your old blog posts and wonder why you stopped, I was quite sad. Welcome back lovely lady!

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  16. A very warm welcome back, Fiona! I have missed your blog terribly and jumped for joy when I saw that you were back. You are a beautiful writer and I am looking forward to reading more fantastic posts.

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  17. Fiona, I'm so glad you are back! I've missed you!

    I walked out of the house yesterday to go to work and forgot to wear perfume and put on my jewelry and I felt oddly naked all day. I can't do without perfume and at least my ring and a watch.

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  18. To be honest - if you're talking about looking expensive - a good tattoo IS expensive. Mine are incredibly meaningful and I'll have them for life - unlike some clothing/shoes/handbags.

    If you've had a 'fashion tattoo' then it will be as regretful as any 'fashion' purchase.

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  19. I am so happy to see that you are back Fiona! Your blog is such an inspiration.

    /Bea

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  20. My parents gave me one advise: Stay clear of looking "Expensive" - So I prefer to be well-turned out, radiant with the posture of a ballerina.

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  21. I know it's not PC to say this but basically you need to be thin. bar a medical condition rarely are rich people not thin. not the same thing as a good figure mind you. People say that Oprah got turned down in Switzerland because she was black but I think the unwritten prejudice was not about color as Switzerland is used to a lot of African dictators loading money into their bank accounts. I think most people would agree it's because she is a big girl...

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  22. I'm so glad you're back and writing more Fiona, you've inspired me to start a blog of my own.

    I work as a flight attendant for a global airline, often in First Class, so I've been up close and personal with many A-listers, CEOs and ludicrously wealthy people - and at their most casual. You've aptly pointed out so many elements to looking 'expensive'. On the whole I've noticed that wealthy people are gracious and polite to anyone that serves them, have excellent posture and seem 'elegant' in the way they move and carry themselves. Most of all, they tend to exude a quiet confidence, they aren't showy or loud but you can tell they are in control. It's fascinating to watch sometimes. Interestingly it's often the types in business class or the 'aspiring rich' that are self-centered, rude and dismissive to those around them - the very rich are often very down to earth as they have no need to put on airs and graces!

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  23. Yes, I think "clean" is apt. Not only as it relates to hygiene but also in regards to clean lines in clothing. Not too many ruffles, lace, color, print, or hardware (on handbags and shoes). I find cleaner lines are more elegant. Tilda Swinton is a good modern example.

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  24. Hi Fiona. Agreed about the tattoos. They look anything but "clean."

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  25. Great blog - love this post especially!

    http://goldendreamland.blogspot.com/

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  26. Agree wholeheartedly about the tattoos. Especially the ones that are visible. I am a nurse and have seen what those things look like as people age and it isn't pretty. It depends on the look you are going for, but tattoos are definitely not elegant.

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  27. Totally agree about the tattoos. Genuine materials are important to me... my vintage coach bags, my silk scarves and cashmere sweaters - they are all thrifted. I would rather spend money on good shoes.

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  28. Wow...judgmental! Comments about bright colors, tatttoos, and all.

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  29. I recently found your blog and have enjoyed reading your post and the comments others have posted. To me, one thing that sets some apart from others is how they treat themselves. Most of us wouldn't say cruel insulting hurtful words to someone else but how do we talk to ourselves? I also have a bracelet tattoo with a cross on my wrist (I got when I was 41) it is profoundly meaningful and beautiful to me. I was a bit surprised by the negative comments about tattoos but it would be a boring world if we all thought exactly the same way.
    Thank you for your beautiful blog. It's inspiring!

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    Replies
    1. This comment is a master class in respectful disagreement.

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  30. I agree withh it all except for the nails...They should never be polished a colour unless its natural. They should be clean, natural, buffed.

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  31. LadyLydia said...
    I agree about the tattoos. Why must any decoration or beauty product be so permanent? There are removeable tattoos and henna paintings which can be washed off and made way for new designs. I have see words tattooed on people who later regret it. Why not just wear a piece of clothing with words or designs on it. Women especially like variety, and what they like today they may not be so excited about tomorrow, so tattoos should be temporary if they feel they want one. Piercing is another thing that should have substitutes available that are temporary, such as adhesive jewelry. Our tastes change as we get older. Look at our hairstyles over the years and be glad the only permanent thing about them was a photograph. Young people should be cautioned about making permanent decisions regarding their skin, as they may think differently later on. Even if a person is proud of their tattoo, other people do not always like staring at someone else's printed skin, as it seems too personal.

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  32. Wow. Tattoos are "vulgar?" I'm so sorry you think that no one with class or style would have tattoos. That must mean that Marc Jacobs has no style or class. Or that runway models like Erin Wasson are not chic in the slightest. I work in the fashion industry, I make great money (in fact, I come from money), I have a Master's Degree, AND I'm heavily tattooed. And anyone who is well-versed in history would know that tattoos did NOT get their beginning in the slave trade as another commenter said. The oldest human body ever found was found with, you guessed it, tattoos. Ancient Egyptian women even had tattoos. I'm so sorry that my thousands of dollars worth of tattoos offend your high class moral code, but maybe you want to broaden your horizons a bit, a rethink your views that tattoos are for the classless and the poor.

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    1. Though tattoos have a long history and are popular among those in the entertainment industry, they were the kiss of death thirty plus years ago when I used to model. I too come from money and the people in our circle who got inked were the rebellious kids who liked to slum it down.

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  33. I agree on most every point. Yes, sophisticated people can break every one of those rules. But as such, well bred people are conservative, and do not get ink. At least not where you can see it. Marc Jacobss is many things, but his appearance doesn't scream Old Money. Tom Ford does. Personally I think a wider heel is a lot more elegant then a stiletto. In my opinion stilettos are almost never flattering, and even models don't walk well in them. But they are moire classic. I still prefer a sort of 1970's streamlined loo. I love kitten heels too. This is just an opinion piece. Its not meant to suggest this is the only way one cam look good.

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  34. Merci, Anonymous. Very eloquently said. Yes, this is just my opinion, and I'm so glad everyone has their own.

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  35. Hello Fiona! Your list is totally on point. Well done! It's my opinion that exuding an air of refinement is first and foremost conveyed through one's grace, confidence, and dignified, polite treatment of others.


    As for external trappings… limit the jewelry. A single ring per hand please! (exception: paired wedding rings). Multiple rings, thumb rings, toe rings, ear chains, these do not exude elegance. For other items a simple stud (earrings, pendant) is sublime. Do invest in a classic timepiece. My Rolex is a personal staple, and I can say that after 20+ years of daily wear this investment has paid for itself ten times over. If bling’s your thing, opt for a diamond bezel. To complement your well chosen pieces, always keep nails well manicured; clear, sheer pink, nude or French is lovely. Blues and neon nails are unforgivable.


    I would add that in cooler climates, sophisticated OUTERWEAR (coat/bag/shoes) is vital. It's what's seen on a daily basis even when your outfit isn't. A Burberry trench is mistake-proof. A wrap coat or cashmere duster in a classic color like navy, camel, (or creamy winter white if you can pull it off) -- paired with a cashmere scarf (a solid color, a classic Burberry plaid, or here's where you can add a bright pop of color with an Hermes patterned scarf). And of course a fine handbag. Chanel, LV, even at entry level these are expensive but a good investment as a classic style will retain it's value for decades. Many collectors covet discontinued or limited editions and seek these "pre-loved" pieces without hesitation -- there is no shame in this option, so if you're feeling priced out of the boutiques check out reputable luxury consignment shops for a classic model in excellent, well cared-for condition. I'm a devotee of the d'Orsay pointy-toe pump and whether a sleek stiletto or understated kitten heel, this is an elegant, ultra-feminine shoe that is forever classic. If heels are impossibly uncomfortable for you, a leather ballet flat or classic Ferragamo skimmer is a good option, along with a classic RL equestrian style riding boot.


    As for your views on tattoos (ink is not an updatable fashion accessory, it's permanent and does NOT wear well over time) -- and to the reader who mentioned rich people are almost always thin -- Bravo to both of you for sharing your opinions with candor and confidence. No disrespect to those with tattoos or a few extra pounds, but these views are widely held and people do judge by appearance which is why this entire article /conversation IS relevant.


    Be Chic and have a fabulous day!


    NYC.BRAT

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  36. Thanks so much for your comprehensive comment, Brat, and your detailed wisdom!

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  37. Fiona,

    Just discovered your site. Agree on all points, especially tattoos! I've often thought about the tattoo removal business and predict, like you , that we'll see them proliferate in the near future.

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  38. Thanks for the insights.
    For women of color ,the neutral colors do not always work well. In my case, bright colors look best on me but quality clothes are rarely so. I've often wondered how African royalty dress; surely they opt for quality.

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  39. Anonymous, you make a good point. I think you're on the right track with African royalty. Also what about looking into clothing styles and colours worn by Oprah, Michelle Obama etc. I'm sure they wear high-price designers but they may wear everyday brands as well.

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  40. To me, being authentic is more valuable than looking rich, and at the end of the day, looking rich does not add any more value to myself. By wearing only the neutrals, life will look so very beige and boring! Since I have been wearing intense colors, I have been feeling alive.

    Color is all over creation, and creation is not "cheap"!

    It all depends on the natural colors of a face: skin, eyes, and hair. These three elements decide what coloring is the very best for us. It is a matter of high contrast, medium contrast, and low contrast.

    I love your spirit and your loveliness. keep up the elegant work!

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  41. Anonymous, 'Color is all over creation, and creation is not "cheap"!' - I love it. Even though I dream of my 'neutrals only' wardrobe, I do still wear and enjoy colour, I'm just careful not to go too much or I look overpowered (I think I must have medium contrast colouring).

    I agree with authenticity too; it's what I am drawn towards more and more as I age.

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  42. Agree totally about tattoos. Maybe it's an age thing butI think they are graffiti. Intelligent, educated young people are getting them, but you cannot convince me they represent chic, class or taste. I believe they are a trend that will pass unless we are descending into a dystopian society. The thought I had about colour was that your rules apply to white people. People with darker skins look really good in bright colours and I think they look chic and sophisticated in colour.

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    1. Great point about brighter colours depending on your skin tone, Shelley. I look washed out with colours that are too saturated. Softer hues let me shine. It's all about our own personal skin/hair/eye colours and what makes us feel good.

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  43. One of the secrets of the wealthy is to buy classic colors and styles as well as good fabrics that are well-sewn. The clothes last forever - maybe a suede patch on the elbow, a new collar on the shirt, and maybe get the shoes re-soled. Their clothes are made to last and are not trendy and in the long run, I see a savings in money.

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    1. I love this philosophy too. Thanks so much for your comment.

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  44. Fiona, I love your columns and always enjoy listening to what you have to say. You are like a best friend, sister, and fairy God-mother all rolled into one!

    I do agree with you that t-shirt material and flow-y boho shirts do not look "rich" but also they do not look poor, either. I think they look creatively casual and artsy, so it depends upon your personality. As you say, they would need to be clean and pressed. I generally do wear jeans and t-shirts (stylish ones, though!) or jeans and boho blouses. I wear them with boots in the winter and dressy flats or great sandals in the summer. However, when I want to look rich, I will dress as you say in your column.

    I had a friend in college who had excellent posture and was very thin (she would comment that sometimes being "too thin was just as embarrassing when naked as being too fat") who exuded that "French girl" look. She could wear jeans and a white Fruit of the Loom men's t-shirt with a simple silver chain necklace and make it look stunning.

    Over the years, this friend has gained a bit of weight and there was plenty of space on her frame for that, but she still garners the admiring glances of men whereever we go, and I believe it is because of her confident and proper posture. It just oozes good elegance.

    I also agree with you that tattoos look tacky, for the most part. I did see one woman at one of those "Spartan Challenge" races that was a tall, goddess like beauty who had her left arm tattooed in a leopard print from her shoulder to her wrist. I was quite impressed on two accounts. First, the originality of it was tops! Secondly, the confidence to be so different and apart from the crowd was amazing as well. I realize that it looked great in her sporty outfit, but I did wonder how it would look in an elegant ball gown. I think it will always bring her great stories and many great memories of her athletic successes.

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    1. Your friend sounds like a great chic mentor to have around. She's one of those who never put a foot wrong, and it's great to be inspired by them.

      In the past year or so I've bought two slightly-boho blouses, and enjoy wearing them with skinny jeans and ballet flats. I agree with you; the boho look doesn't look 'poor', but arty. Also, to me it doesn't read as polished as some other styles. It's all down to your personal taste. I admire those who can pull off boho, but I can only do it in very small doses.

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  45. I find the discussion here on tattoos to be absolutely fascinating- particularly the outrage expressed by some when presented with the opinion that tattoos are not elegant. It's as though something not being judged elegant necessarily denotes it as crude or distasteful. Why the extremes? Couldn’t we assume that something not particularly elegant is just not worthy of note, common, or ordinary (which, like it or not, tattoos are quickly becoming in contemporary society?) “Elegant” is a superlative, after all.

    I can’t help but wonder how the definition of elegance will change with time. Now that we have two or so heavily tattooed generations, will society change its opinion about what constitutes elegance as our current archetypes age and eventually pass on? Will New York’s storied Park Avenue society ladies be sporting wrinkled and faded tattoos with their Chanel suites in another 30 or 50 years with no one raising an eyebrow? It will be interesting to see.

    On another note, I wanted to congratulate you, Fiona, on work well done. I’m slowly working my way through your “Thirty Chic Days” (savoring one chapter at a time before I get out of bed in the morning) and it’s been a lovely inspiration for each day. Thank you also for recommending Alexandra Stoddard. I’d not heard of her prior to your book and have truly been enjoying her writing as well! Two lovely discoveries in one.

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    1. It certainly will be interesting to see how archetypes change, Lenka, and thank you for your thoughtful comments on tattoos and elegance.

      I'm so glad you are enjoying my book and yes, I love Alexandra Stoddard so much! I have to be in the right mood for her but I think she has such an enchanted view on living well.

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Merci for your comment. Wishing you a chic day!

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